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How do different Registrars learn? Which techniques facilitate their best learning outcomes? Are current education and training programs providing the support Registrars need?

At GPTQ research is an important part of what we do. Our medical educators are always seeking to improve knowledge and understanding of General Practice education.

GPTQ currently has three exciting educational research projects underway. These projects will contribute broadly to General Practice education programs and inform how we continue to improve and hone the education and training we provide.

 

Supporting on-the-job learning for Registrars

Project title: COSA (Consultation-based oversight, support and advice)

This project, made possible through a RACGP research grant, is evaluating education of Supervisors on strategies for in-consultation teaching of Registrars in the context of a typical, busy day of consulting. It builds on previous research by GPTQ into the factors associated with interruptions (or not being interrupted) during consultations. The goal of the project is to develop an education model that ensures patient safety whilst supporting Registrar learning.

 

Understanding PEP participant performance and learning

Project title: Multisource feedback performance and reflectivity in Practice Experience Program (PEP) participants.

Are the experiences of PEP participants comparable to those of Registrars undertaking the AGPT program? This research project seeks to find out. Made possible through a RACGP research grant, the project will compare assessment outcomes from both groups, as well as dig deeper to investigate the ability of candidates in both streams to self-reflect on their performance.

 

Sensitive learning for rural trainees

Project title: Safe learning environments for rural GP trainees – Understanding the relationship between emotions, psychological safety and feedback.

Rurally placed Registrars often face challenges with isolation, dislocation from family, the experience of uncertainty in a new clinical context and new supervisory relationships. These challenges can create a high stakes environment for learning. This project, made possible through an ACRRM educational research grant, will investigate the emotional and safety issues involved for rural Registrars when being assessed and given feedback by Supervisors. A key part of the research will involve participating Registrars recording audio diaries of their feedback experiences.